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The 2019 agenda will be available in April. You may view the 2018 agenda below.

 

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM NA Just For Today – Morning Meditation Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in Bass River Foyer for Learning Intensive Attendees
7:00 AM – 7:00 PM Onsite Registration Hours
7:45 AM – 12:00 PM Fred French Golf Scramble

Thursday Intensive Learning Morning Workshops

8:30 AM – 12:00 PM

 

150. Prodependence: Moving Beyond Codependency
Robert Weiss, LCSW, CSAT, ABD
Supported by: Seeking Integrity LLC
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Over the past near 3-decades, Codependency has been the go-to model for loved ones and spouses of addicts and alcoholics, yet it has yet to become a formalized diagnosis. Prodependence is a newly developed, more invitational platform designed encourage spouses and loved-ons to participate in treatment and recovery.

Thursday Intensive Learning Morning Workshops

8:30 AM – 12:00 PM

 

110a. Addiction Treatment Marketing II (Courses Toward a Certificate In Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM)) Module 5 (No CE Credit)
Kristina Sherry, Esq
Andrew Martin, MBA LAADC
Supported by: Behavioral Health Association of Providers
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

In this course you examine the fundamental questions, “What is addiction treatment marketing?” and “How is addiction treatment marketing distinct from marketing in general?” You explore key issues related to compliance and enforcement, including the stakeholders, relevant healthcare laws, potentially abusive practices, as well as fees, reimbursements, and services. You also consider best practices related to outreach, referrals, and building trust and relationships with patients, families, and other treatment professionals.

This course qualifies as one of six courses in the C-ATM Certification (note that 36 hours are required for certification which can be completed online).

In sessions one we will be discussing…
– Healthcare law, compliance, and enforcement
– Potentially abusive practices

Morning Break in the Bass River Foyer

10:00AM – 10:30AM

Thursday Intensive Learning All Day Workshops

8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

 

125. Professional Nursing Track for Addictions Education
Donna White, RN, PhD, CNS, CADAC, LADC I, CARN
Charlene Richardson, MSN, RN, CEN, LNC
Jake Nichols PharmD, RPh, MBA
Meg Doherty, APRN, MSN
Carol Mallia, RN, MSN
Brianne Fitzgerald, RN, MSN, FNP-C, PMHNP-BC, MPH
Adam Barrett, RN, BSN, MEd, CARN
Supported by: Massachusetts Nurses Association, Strategic Recovery Resources & Recovery Matters
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

The following is a Track of Continuing Education specifically geared towards Professional Nurses who are interested in increasing their knowledge of Addictive Disorders. The domains included in this track are Physiology of Addictions, Health Sequelae, Pharmacology of Medication Assisted Treatment of Substance Use Disorders and related Public Health issues, Drug Diversion and Addictions related legal ramifications within the Profession of Nursing. The education provided in this Track is also applicable to the Continuing Education Requirements for the Addictions Nursing Certification (CARN).

The day long (6 continuing hour) session will include:
– Introduction of Domains
– Drugs on the Street-What’s being seen and treated in the ER
– The Neurobiology of Drug Dependence: Clinical Benefits and Pharmacology of Medication Assisted Treatment
– Home Care of the Client with Addiction and Co-occurring Medical Conditions: Providing Care in the Residential Setting
– Drug Diversion by Healthcare Professionals: Identification, Treatment and Licensure Issues
– Challenging the Prevailing Wisdom: Has Harm Reduction Become the New Norm?

 

126. Mud, Water, and Light: Experiential Adventures and Metaphor
Robert Chapman, MSW, LMSW, LADAC, EMDR I & II
Supported by: Onsite & Milestones at Onsite
Level of Instruction: All

We will examine the task of introspection and the recovery path with a mythological perspective journeying to three introspective destinations emphasizing clinical applications and relevance. Creative group and individual experiential methods will be modeled, designed to assist in facilitating introspection, reprocessing and resourcing within the therapeutic process. Presentation of experiential techniques with emphasis on skill development. The power of metaphor will be emphasized while building practical skills. The techniques presented will include work with co-occurring disorders, addictions and attachments, trauma and core issues. Focus on modeling techniques as participants work their own issues to enhance ability to utilize techniques in your practice. Engaging theory and clinical formats for healing are presented as a “therapeutic set up” for experiential work. Experiential techniques will be modeled and processed one by one, connecting to phases of introspection. Experiential techniques can bring more animation, energy, or adventure in groups and individual sessions.

 

127. When We Get Behind Closed Doors: Clinical Supervision for Client Care and Clinician Growth
Alan Lyme, LISW, MSW, ICCS, ICADC, MAC
Supported by: Phoenix Center
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

As the substance use and mental health field is constantly changing, clinical supervision is the cornerstone for staff development and quality assurance. Whether a seasoned veteran or fresh-out-of-college, addictions counselors legally and ethically need clinical supervision. How well that supervision is managed may have an impact not only on the clinician but also on the experience and outcome for each client. This overview of clinical supervision will offer a window into managing staff needs in an array of issues and will address not only the challenges that quality supervision presents but also some solutions that may help both supervisor and supervisee get more from the experience.

 

128. DOT SAP Refresher Course
Nicole Hanratty, CEAP, SAP, SAE, C-DERT
Supported by: American Substance Abuse Professionals
Level of Instruction: Advanced

The DOT SAP Refresher Course is designed to provide Substance Abuse Professionals with a review of relevant DOT drug and alcohol testing rules, an overview of changes to the regulations and clarification of commonly encountered DOT Operating Administration (Mode) specific regulatory questions.

This training will provide you with the information required by the Department of Transportation regulations (40.281 (d)) to earn 6 CEU credits.

C-ATM Course

1:30 PM – 3:30 PM

 

110b. Addiction Treatment Marketing II (Courses Toward a Certificate In Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM)) Module 5 (No CE Credit)
Kristina Sherry, Esq
Andrew Martin, MBA LAADC
Supported by: Behavioral Health Association of Providers
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This course qualifies as one of six courses in the C-ATM Certification (note that 36 hours are required for certification which can be completed online).

In Session 2 we will be discussing:
– Fees, reimbursements, and services
– Outreach and referrals
– Building trust and relationships

Thursday Special Events

1:30 PM – 5:00 PM

 

156. Women Leaders in Behavioral Health: Power Up Your Personal Net Worth in the Workplace
Jeri Davis, MBA
Cherlyne Short Majors, PhD
Mary Pigatti, MSW
Supported by: Jeri Davis International, the Willow Institute & Livongo
Level of Instruction: All

You deserve to move up in management, be appropriately compensated and recognized for your contributions or discover the job of your dreams. This exciting, one-of-a-kind women only workshop will give you the confidence, tools and direction to kick-start your career to the next level by providing “how-to’s” for finding and securing your ideal Job.

Learn how to change your life and improve your personal capital in the workplace by:

  • adding thousands of dollars to your paycheck
  • having a dream career and knowing how to actualize it
  • managing & negotiating from a position of power

Thursday Intensive Learning Afternoon Workshop

1:30 PM – 5:00 PM

 

175. Clinical Collaboration & Care Advocacy in the Courtroom
Jeffrey Merrick, Juris Doctor Esq
Sharon Volner, LMFT
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This breakout session will provide participants with the presenters’ best practices and practical
experience in reaching better outcomes for our recovering clients with legal issues. Best recovery
outcomes come from stronger care advocacy and clinical collaboration between treatment program,
attorneys and the courts. The presenters will share their unique perspective as clinician and
attorney/interventionist, providing specific strategies, current trends and case examples based on their
in the field collaboration. Participants will be challenged not only to help our clients succeed in the
courtroom, but to translate the external motivators of a given court case or intervention into success in
treatment. This success is measured not just in our clients’ recovery, but in building stronger and more
effective treatment practice and strategies.

Afternoon Break in the Bass River Foyer

3:00 PM – 3:30 PM

Hors d’oeuvres Networking Reception

5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Opening Plenary

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

 

199. The Importance of Collaboration When Treating Co-Occurring Disorders
Jaime Vinck, LPC, NCC, CEIP
Tena Moyer, MD
Supported by: Sierra Tucson
Level of Instruction: All

In this complicated day and age, clients do not fit neatly into one diagnostic category. Psychotherapy, Psychiatry and Medical are being challenged to break down the historical silos and respect one another’s “seat at the table” in terms of providing comprehensive treatment. As the body of research and literature has expanded in the psychiatric, psychological and biological sciences, it is time to re-examine the construct of dual diagnosis and expand. This presentation will weave developmental theory, brain biology, polyvagal theory, family systems, psychodynamic theory, trauma and attachment theory into the Dual Diagnosis paradigm. We will discuss the importance of Collaborative, Integrated Treatment in healing the whole person, Furthermore, by using case studies, we will apply these concepts in such a way as to broaden our understanding of our patients so that we may develop more comprehensive, individualized and effective treatment models.

 

Back to top

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM NA Just For Today – Morning Meditation Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 6:00 PM Onsite Registration Hours in Barnstable II
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
7:30 AM – 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall Hours

Friday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

200. Dangerous Desire: The Dark Side of Sexual Compulsivity and Disordered Intimacy
Caroline Smith, MA, LPC, CSAT-S, CMAT-S, CIP & EMDR
Supported by: Pine Grove Behavioral Health
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

It has been said that the internet is the crack cocaine of sex addiction; however, sexual compulsivity and disordered intimacy have been shattering families well before the development of our current technology. This session will explore the many faces of disordered intimacy and sexual compulsivity. Early childhood experiences, arousal template etiologies, attachment style expressions and effective clinical strategies will all be considered.

C-ATM Course

8:40 AM – 9:50 AM

 

210a. Ethical Compensation Practices (Courses Toward a Certificate In Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM)) Module 6 (No CE Credit)
Kristina Sherry, Esq
Andrew Martin, MBA, LAADC
Supported by: Behavioral Health Association of Providers
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This course qualifies as one of six courses in the C-ATM Certification (note that 36 hours are required for certification which can be completed online).

In this course you examine the fundamental questions, “What are ethical compensation practices in healthcare marketing?” and “Why are they so important?” You explore legal and ethical best practices related to contracts and client rights, compensation of marketers, and call centers and lead generation. You also consider how to avoid common compensation pitfalls, such as fraud and abuse, exploitation, inducements, brokering, and kickbacks.

In Session One we will be discussing: Contracts and client rights

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Friday Mid Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

 

225. Livin’ on the Edge: A Model for Leading Edge Treatment and Culture
Ilana Zivkovich, LCSW, LCDC, CDWF
Supported by: WERQ Leadership Services
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

As treatment providers, we share the common goal of effectively helping clients live fulfilling, healthy, happy lives. The In Vivo? (or “in life”) model of treatment empowers clients with appropriate opportunities to experience the joys, challenges, stresses, and successes of “real life” while within the supportive treatment environment. In this interactive workshop, key teachings from Positive Psychology, Cue Exposure Therapy, and cutting edge brain science will be synthesized as the theoretical foundation of this model is explored. Additionally, the rationale behind emphasizing a healthy organizational culture, as well as the elements necessary to sustain it will be covered. Drawing from the research of Dr. Brené Brown, participants will learn about trust, vulnerability and courage as they relate to organizational culture. Attendees will leave enriched through exposure to cutting edge research to enhance both their overall approach to addressing addictions, as well as their style of engagement within their professional lives.

 

226. The Forgotten Patient- A Family Systems Approach to Treating Trauma and Addiction
Trish Caldwell, MFT, LPC, CCDP-D, CAADC, CCTP
Supported by: Recovery Centers of America
Level of Instruction: All

Research tells us that recovery is strengthened when family or a primary support system exists. Individuals seeking treatment for substance use disorders have opportunities to gain education and insight and process their experiences and emotions while developing healthy coping mechanisms. However, families can be forgotten and loved ones often do not receive the same information and support, thus perpetuating their tendency to be organized around the chaos of addiction rather than being organized to the recovery. For many families the symptoms of trauma are often left untreated, leading to behaviors that place themselves and their loved one in recovery at risk of of past dynamics. Integrating the families allows for them to express themselves in a safe and supportive environment while also learning about the recovery process and ways to both start their our journey of recovery as well as to support the recovery of their loved one.

 

227. Emerging Digital Health Technologies and Continuing Care
Arthur Trotzky, PhD, DCC
Supported by: Hope Homes Recovery Services
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Many patients, perhaps the majority, do not engage in standard continuing care although it may be available for them. This creates a strong case for the importance of new continuing care models that can supplement, and in some cases replace, the traditional clinical-based approach. Emerging digital health technologies (DHT’s) show promise for helping both to refine therapies for the client’s individual needs while providing support in settings beyond the clinic. This workshop is designed for treatment personnel who want to consider offering continuing care and support services via the Internet for individual, group, family or alumni completing initial recovery programs. Participants will be introduced to basic ethical practices that will enable them to introduce and implement secure Internet technology into the clinical setting and ongoing care plan.

 

228. Practical approaches for complex conditions: Focus on Substance Use Disorders cooccurring with Borderline Personality and Sleep Disorders
Monika Kolodziej, PhD
Rocco Iannucci, MD
Catherine Milliken, LCSW,LADC,CCS
Frederick Goggans, MD
Supported by: McLean Hospital
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This workshop will address practical approaches to improve clinical care for individuals with Substance Use Disorders (SUDs) and complex co-occurring conditions, focusing on Borderline Personality Disorder and on Sleep Disorders. Such complex conditions are the rule not the exception among people with SUDs, and may adversely affect treatment engagement, prognosis, and outcomes. Clinicians who treat persons with SUDs can expect to regularly encounter individuals with challenges stemming from personality and/or sleep disorders, and therefore need to understand principals of managing these conditions. Our workshop will address the need for straightforward, practical approaches for treating persons with these complex comorbidities in addiction-focused treatment settings. After a brief review of the associations between co-occurring SUDs and Borderline Personality Disorder and/or Sleep Disorders, we will address clinical features and treatment outcomes of persons with these co-occurring conditions, present evidence-based treatments, and illustrate effective practices through a case-based presentation and discussion.

 

229. Importance of Availability of Options in Choice of Addiction Recovery Pathway
Joseph Gerstein, MD, FACP. RETIRED
Supported by: New England Chapters of ASAM
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Over the last 50 years clinical studies have demonstrated that in a variety of psychological diagnoses clients do better with several possible options for treatment when they choose rather than a clinician or random assignment. Clinical examples. Dichotomies: Locus of control-Internal vs. External; Religious-Non-theist/Agnostic; Platonic-Aristotlean. Spectrums: World-Views. Legal: 10/Circuit/Supreme Courts: Non-theists cannot be coerced into 12-Step programs without offer of secular option. Reasons for leaving 12-Step meetings:Hyper-Religiosity or Autocracy. 30% of regular SMART participants also go to 12-Step meetings. Ethical: Under principles of beneficence and autonomy, client should have option(s) when possible. Recent paper in AMA J Ethics
supported options in face of murky clinical evidenciary standards. Pragmatic Options: 12-Step, LifeRing, Secular Organization for Sobriety, Women For Sobriety, SMART Recovery: SMART now has 2,600 global meetings. 1500 in US. The SMART Program is endorsed by NIDA, NIAAA, SAMHSA, NADCP, EAPA, NICE (UK) and NCHQR (Australia). SMART Bibliography now >100 items

 

230. The Power of Personality: Enneagram and Client Breakthroughs
Crystal Stokes, MACP, MFTA
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Learn a new way to understand your clients (and yourself) through the Power of Personality. In this upbeat and stimulating workshop, Crystal will introduce you to the basics of the Enneagram, take you through each of the 9 Types, and show you how to use David Daniel’s Stanford Inventory. Do you ever feel stuck in your work with clients? The Enneagram is an excellent tool for taking communication to the next level and fostering deep compassion for differences between people. Crystal has used the Enneagram to find a common language between herself, clients and their family which facilitates breakthroughs and healing.

C-ATM Course

10:55 AM – 12:05 PM

 

210b. Ethical Compensation Practices (Courses Toward a Certificate In Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM)) Module 6 (No CE Credit)
Kristina Sherry, Esq
Andrew Martin, MBA, LAADC
Supported by: Behavioral Health Association of Providers
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This course qualifies as one of six courses in the C-ATM Certification (note that 36 hours are required for certification which can be completed online).

In Session 2 we will be discussing:
• Fees, reimbursements, and services
• Outreach and referrals
• Building trust and relationships

Friday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

 

250. Building a Quality Program from the Inside Out
Marsha Stone, JD, LCDC
James Flowers, PhD, LPC-S
Jeff Skillen
Supported by: BRC Recovery, SkillSet Enterprises & Kemah Palms Recovery
Level of Instruction: All

Industry thought leaders, Marsha Stone, JD, LCDC, and James Flowers, PhD share their experiences with building quality treatment programs from the inside out. From timely topics to relevant business practices, this moderated discussion will provide you with real-life insight and current programming strategies used in nationally accredited treatment facilities to meet the ever-changing needs of today’s population(s) seeking treatment.

Friday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

 

251. Family Recovery is the Solution!
Stacie Lucius, LCMHC, MLADC
Teri Savoie, MSW, LCSW
Supported by: WestBridge
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Mental Illness and Addiction are chronic brain diseases that affect the whole family. As such, it is important that families define and enter their own recovery as well. That is, it’s not just about family members having goals for their loved ones in treatment, but it’s about families having goals for themselves as well. Research has demonstrated that family treatment improves recovery rates for those in treatment. Engaging families in treatment helps families to develop coping skills, improve communication and problem-solving skills.

This workshop will review the benefits of engaging families in treatment and helping families to define their own recovery. Primary focus will be to introduce several ways of guiding the family through the recovery process, which will be introduced through didactic presentation and some experiential engagement.

 

252. Treating the Whole Girl: A Discussion of Service Development for Girls Using Voices: A Program of Self-Discovery and Empowerment for Girls as an Example
Candice Norcott, PhD
Supported by: University of Chicago
Level of Instruction: All

Adolescence is a time of discovery, struggle, and growth. This is particularly difficult for girls. Their challenges can be exacerbated by our culture – which often offers girls a toxic environment in which to grow. Many young women lose their voice in this process. This workshop is based on the revised curriculum Voices: A Program of Self-Discovery and Empowerment for Girls. Built on a foundation rooted in resiliency theory and experiential learning, it is designed to encourage girls and young women to find and express themselves.

The focus of this training is on interactive exercises demonstrating strategies that service providers can use with girls. Topics covered include developing a positive sense of self, building healthy relationships, substance use, physical and emotional wellness, sexuality and planning for a positive future. Pathways to the criminal justice system and the experiences of young women and girls once they become involved are addressed.

 

253. Adventure Therapy: More than Games
Ricardo Santiago, LMHC, MS
Nicky Treadway, MA, LMHC, NCC
Supported by: AION Recovery & Epic Adventures Therapy LLC
Level of Instruction: Introductory

Adventure therapy is an emerging treatment model focusing on physical activity, nature environments and specially designed experiential activities to engage clients in novel and practical ways. This approach involve specially designed experiential activities designed to develop metaphors to facilitate deeper exploration of client challenges, elicit powerful emotions, and provide opportunity to practice coping skills and develop insight in a real-world environment. This workshop will introduce the major concepts of adventure therapy, illustrate the clinical methodology, present research findings on its effectiveness and illustrate application to substance abuse treatment. This workshop will involve some activities/games in addition to didactic/lecture.

 

254. Methadone Direct Admissions: From Inpatient Hospitalization to Opioid Treatment Program, Best Practices for Success
Heidi Ginter, MD
Daniel Brain Greer, MA, LMHC, LADC1, CADC
Zoe Weinstein, MD, MS
Supported by: Health Care Resource Centers & New England Chapters of ASAM
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

This workshop will address the evidence and rationale for starting methadone maintenance during inpatient hospitalization for those patients with opioid use disorder in addition to their primary diagnosis requiring inpatient treatment. We will describe the state and federal regulations that permit this type of coordinated care to occur. We will present data on how the strategy of starting opioid agonist therapy during an acute hospitalization reduces the risk of overdose and death following hospital discharge in this vulnerable patient population. The experience of coordinated care between Boston Medical Center and Health Care Resource Centers’ Opioid Treatment Programs will be described. Features of this program that have contributed to its success will be highlighted.

 

255. I am Not My Struggle: Rejecting Insecurity and Owning One’s Self Using Out-of-the-Box Interventions
Sharon Volner, LMFT
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs
Level of Instruction: All

This presentation is geared towards therapists, clinical supervisors, interventionists, counselors, program administrators and other stakeholders providing direct care to programs and clients struggling with addiction. Cognitive Behavioral Interventions are designed to help clients work through negative automatic thought patters that hinder progression, sobriety, and stability in daily functioning.

 

256. Addiction as a Symptom of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Combat and Military Sexual Trauma Veterans
Rick Sautter, MSW, LCSW
Supported by: FEAST-Family Education and Skills Training
Level of Instruction: All

Research has dramatically increased our understanding of the causes and impacts of both PTSD and addiction on the brain and body. Symptoms of PTSD, including addiction, are survival strategies and coping mechanisms that help the Veteran deal with experiences that the human body is not built for. Many clinicians and both government and private organizations concentrate on pathologizing some symptoms and focusing attention on “desensitizing” trauma narratives. Recognizing addiction as a symptom of PTSD will help clinicians and counselors understand and assist Veterans to reframe their behaviors and impulses to survival mechanisms that no longer serve them. I will discuss effective ways of incorporating treatment approaches that give Veterans and others tools to self-regulate and effectively deal with addictive symptoms by reducing the emotional impact in the limbic brain. Among the theoretical approaches to be discussed are Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, Emotionally Focused Therapy, EMDR, Somatic Experiencing, biofeedback, and neurofeedback.

C-ATM Course

2:10 PM – 3:20 PM

 

210c. Ethical Compensation Practices (Courses Toward a Certificate In Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM)) Module 6 (No CE Credit)
Kristina Sherry, Esq
Andrew Martin, MBA, LAADC
Supported by: Behavioral Health Association of Providers
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This course qualifies as one of six courses in the C-ATM Certification (note that 36 hours are required for certification which can be completed online).

In Session 3 we will be discussing: Call centers and lead generation

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

Friday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

 

275. Innovative Case Finding: Screening and Assessment of Arrestees and Medical Patients
Norman Hoffmann, PhD
Supported by: C4 Recovery Foundation
Level of Instruction: All

This presentation will provide pragmatic tools for screening SUD, PTSD, and depression in addition to efficient diagnostic assessment strategies in various populations with high prevalence of substance use disorders. It will focus on those who typically are not identified for possible treatment admissions. Data from recent arrestees in a jail will illustrate how screening and assessment principles can be applied and how data from such assessments have implications for public safety and public health.

Findings from recent arrestees demonstrate a shift from alcohol to opioids and stimulants as the most prevalent substance use disorders in this high-risk population. Related to this trend, about one in three recent arrestees reported injecting drugs on a regular basis – a serious public health issue. This presentation will describe how comprehensive yet efficient assessment procedures can also be applied to other high-risk populations such as hospitalized medical patients. Policy implications will also be provided.

 

276. Get (More) Creative to Engage and Retain Clients
Thomas Greaney, MEd, CCDP, LADC, SAP
Supported by: Savvy Communications
Level of Instruction: All

What do the Grinch, Pinocchio, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Razzle Dazzle Rose, George Bailey and a Strength-based version of the 12-Steps have in common? They can all be used as a vehicle to engage and retain clients with co-occurring disorders and stave off burnout for clinicians. The client with both a substance use and mental health disorder can be challenging to reach but creativity lowers one’s defenses and helps unleash dormant or untapped creativity. This interactive and experiential seminar will help participants recapture a zeal for facilitation and provides six (6) psycho-educational groups that can easily be implemented with individuals and groups. Creativity is not so much a talent as a state of mind, a willingness to make mental connections and create new possibilities. It has the ability to not only enliven a discussion, but to refresh a career. Join Tom Greaney on a journey to knock down barriers.

 

277. Enhanced Connection as the Path to Relapse Resilience (Where Healthy Therapy Meets Healthy 12-step Recovery Meets Spirituality)
Michael Dinneen, LCSW, CACIII, CSAT
Supported by: C4 Consulting
Level of Instruction: All

The workshop will help attendees develop tools to help the people they serve from stage I to stage II recovery.

True connection and intimacy cannot be fully realized without healthy attachment. Michael Dinneen will describe the process of healing relationships and growing spiritually through experiential therapies such as EFT (Emotionally Focused Therapy).

So much attention is giving to the first 6 months of recovery from addictions and co-occurring disorders and the field needs to provide specialized focus for people in long-term recovery (as they trudge the road to a happy destiny).

Michael will provide a 90 minute journey through early, mid and later stage healing and recovery that will inform the attendee of their own need for self-care and give them a road map for what their clients need as well.

 

278. The Family Dance; Don’t Call Me An Enabler
Kat Willis, PhD, CADC II, CEAP retired, CCTP
Supported by: FEAST-Family Education and Skills Training
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Family programs have traditionally divided the “codependents” from the “significant Other” (addict). I am suggesting dropping all labels and creating a family program with everyone present, including several families at one time organized around concepts of attachment and attachment trauma. To accomplish this includes periods of education followed by physical movement. In this workshop, I intend attendees to learn experientially by getting involved in the movement of the psycho-drama and utilization of presentation of family trees. I will include information of attachment, PTSD, Memory and trauma memory, neuro-biology, and the impact of epigenetics. I will also include several case studies from my experience with families.

 

279. Adult ADHD, Amphetamne, Addiction, and the Amygdala
James Berry, MD, diplomat ABFM, diplomat ABAM, FASAM
Supported by: SMART Child and Family Services & New England Chapters of ASAM
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

ADHD and addiction commonly co-occur and each condition affects the course of the other. There is strong evidence for benefit of stimulant medication in treatment of adult ADHD, but frustratingly, these benefits don’t translate well to their use in early recovery. In this presentation, we will consider the evidence for approaches to ADHD in the addiction treatment setting, look at the latest evidence on the nature of adult ADHD, and examine the overlap between childhood trauma and ADHD, including how both conditions are mediated through the amygdala, and the implications of this connection in developing treatment strategies.

 

280. Nature, Nurture and Network: How Our Inner and Outer Environments Affect the Development of Selfhood or High-Risk Behavior
Julia Rose Polk, MA, LMFT
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

This workshop examines how our genetic makeups and external factors are both be major contributors to whether we develop functional and developmentally-appropriate behaviors or dysfunctional and developmentally-immature behaviors.

C-ATM Course

4:25 PM – 6:00 PM

 

210d. Ethical Compensation Practices (Courses Toward a Certificate In Addiction Treatment Marketing (C-ATM)) Module 6 (No CE Credit)
Kristina Sherry, Esq
Andrew Martin, MBA, LAADC
Supported by: Behavioral Health Association of Providers
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This course qualifies as one of six courses in the C-ATM Certification (note that 36 hours are required for certification which can be completed online).

In Session 4 we will be discussing: Avoiding common compensation pitfalls.

Friday Evening Brand Bash

7:30 PM – 10:00 PM

 

Back to top

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM NA Just For Today – Morning Meditation Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 6:00 PM Onsite Registration Hours in Barnstable II
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
7:30 AM – 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall Hours

Saturday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

300. Opioid Treatment – Evolved
Andrea Barthwell, MD, DFASAM
Supported by: Two Dreams
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Andrea G. Barthwell, MD, DFASAM, former Deputy Director of Demand Reduction, White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, is uniquely placed to review the environment of care and recommend strategies to expand access that can be employed by clinicians who are trying to save lives and provide access to individualized care. Her presentation will explore the critical role that practitioners have in helping an individual with OUD decide whether medication assisted treatment is necessary, or not. Dr. Barthwell will delve into the basis of neuroadaptation to OUD, differential outcomes for three different strategies of management of OUD, purpose of different strategies used to treat OUD, and assist the clinical in formulating a plan to present the strategies before assisting the patient in selection of a modality of care.

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management (PART 1)

8:30 AM – 12:15 PM

 

310. Developing Business Through Relationships with Physicians and the Provision of Incidental Medical Services, the Do’s and Don’ts in This Area
Lee Arian, Esq
Supported by: Behavioral Health Association of Providers
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

The participant will learn about the ethics, legal obligations, and industry best practices with regard to developing business through relationships with medical providers. Some may be surprised at the restrictions placed on these types of relationships at the federal and state level. But don’t let that deter you from relationship marketing: if done properly, the relationship can be beneficial for all parties involved, including the patient.

In this session we will be disscussing:
– Building business relationships with medical providers on ethical principles
– Legal principles and obligations surrounding business relationships with medical providers
– Federal restrictions pertaining to business relationships with medical providers
– State restrictions pertaining to business relationships with medical providers
– Best practices to build proper relationships with medical providers

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Saturday Mid Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

 

325. The Role of Parents in Young Adults Sustaining Recovery
Diana Clark, JD, MA
Supported by: Turnbridge
Level of Instruction: All

While technically of adult years, many young adults who struggle with Substance Use Disorders and other co-occurring disorders lack the tools and capacity to cope with the demands of recovery and other life challenges. As a result, parents often fill in the gaps of their young adults’ functioning and unwittingly promote continued dysfunction and regression. This session discusses how to engage parents in the treatment and recovery process and the relevant information and support they need to stop “over-functioning” and instead, focus on family recovery. Through the use of a PowerPoint presentation, case studies and worksheets, presenters lead the group to understand the importance of family involvement and the methods to successfully engage parents in the recovery process.

 

326. Developing Integrated Behavioral Health and Physical Health Recovery Oriented Outcomes for Dual Disorders
Mary Woods, BC-RN, LCS, LADC, MSHS
Supported by: Mary Ryan Woods Consulting
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

There is a constant tension in defining recovery for people who experience dual disorders and who often have chronic medical conditions as well. The tension stems from measuring symptoms of mental illness and substance use disorders in combination with medical illnesses that are also chronic in nature; verses symptoms of recovery and progress. Recovery is a process that occurs over time with people being at different Stages of Change for multiple recovery measures. In a Recovery Oriented System of Care,that is holistic, it is important to focus on what people are doing well and the progress that they are making in a variety of areas. This presentation will review seven Recovery oriented measures and six Wellness measures that were developed in collaboration with the Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center and families and individuals who experience Dual Disorders of mental illness and substance use disorders.

 

327. Stages of Change for Co-Occurring mental Health and Substance Use Conditions
Deb Lynskey-Lake, LCSW, MSW
Supported by: Origins Behavioral HealthCare
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Can individuals be treated successfully for co-occurring disorders and substance use disorders when they present to treatment but do so unwillingly or without commitment? Here we explore the possibilities, myths and stages of change, and successful techniques of meaningful engagement, communication and collaboration with the patient. Participants will discover through small groups and their own interactions in proposed case studies, Motivational Interviewing techniques and the clinician’s own style and practice of empathy and listening. Learn how the vital communications link between clinician and patient is forged in initial meetings. Participants will learn the efficacy of collaborative planning in individual treatment and relapse prevention. We examine quadrants of co-occurring disorders, relapse, cyclical learning and hope, and the role of holistic therapies and spirituality in treatment. The successful navigation of stages of change are presented in individualized, longer treatment and the realization of an individual’s authentic goals.

 

328. Build It and They Will Come (No CE Credit)
Samuel Silverman, MD, DFASAM, FAPA
Jonathan Allen, MD
Supported by: Rushford & New England Chapters of ASAM
Level of Instruction: All

Physician’s have little exposure to Addition Medicine. The ASAM Educational is a unique way to address this barrier. CT-ASAM over the past 6 years has organized an annual competition among all physicians in their medical training. Medical students, residents and fellows have been among the participants. The competition requires a 10-slide presentation on the impact of addiction on your training and what you’ve been able to do or learn about it. Each entrant gets an honorarium for submitting. Monetary prizes are awarded. The submissions are reviewed by the ASAM members and the competition is held at our Annual ASAM meeting. The workshop will discuss the process of implementation and previous entrants/winners will present their slides and comment. The ASAM Educational is a collaborative effort with the Connecticut State Medical Society, ASAM and the 2 Addiction Medicine Fellowships in Ct (Rushford and Yale).

 

329. Organizational Health: Growing Sustainable Culture For Behavioral Treatment Providers
Jonathan De Carlo, CAC III
Supported by: C4 Consulting
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

With rapidly changing conditions of the behavioral health market, the greatest asset of any organization is often prioritized the least: Organizational Health. This presentation will offer perspective into the historical landscape of organizational health challenges from the providers’ perspective. We will examine common organizational behaviors, habits, and responses to systemic health challenges exhibited by treatment providers and explore solution-oriented approaches to growing a sustainable culture of progressive organizational health.

 

330. The Soul of Recovery: Maintaining Integrity through Spiritual Practices
Gina Tabrizy, LMFT
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Research has shown that increased spiritual practices have been associated with improved treatment outcomes and decreased recidivism. In the context of treatment, we need to become familiar with the ideology of our clients and how to bridge the gap of spirituality between our programmatic beliefs, personal beliefs, and the client’s beliefs on this subject. Yet there often seems to be a disconnect between the self-care of the staff versus the expected care and treatment of the clients. This often results in high turnover rates due to burn-out or compassion fatigue. This presentation will explore the concept of spirituality, as characterized by the individual, while exploring ways to disseminate an overall program of spiritual growth. This will include an understanding of mindfulness practices and tools to facilitate spiritual growth of staff through an overarching style of spiritual leadership with the primary concepts of love, kindness, and compassion in all things.

Saturday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

 

350. Medical Cannabis and Addiction Medicine Practice Consequences
Brian Hurley, MD, MBA, DFASAM
Supported by: Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health & New England Chapters of ASAM
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

The prevalence of cannabis use for purported medical indications increases in stated that adopt medical marijuana laws. A firm understanding of the association between cannabis use and substance use disorder treatment management is critical to the modern practice of addiction medicine. This lunchtime luncheon didactic will review the literatures related to cannabis use and other substance use disorders. A discussion addressing modern addiction medicine practices and implications for patients who use cannabis will be provided. The bulk of the workshop will then introduce several practical clinical approaches that addiction medicine clinicians can use when providing medical care to patients who use cannabis, including those who have been issued cards authorizing the possession and use of cannabis for purported medical indications. The session will conclude by introducing a motivational interviewing technique that can be used to evoke a patients’ own motivation and commitment to change their cannabis use.

Strategic Learning Series for Executive Management (PART 2)

2:00 PM – 5:45 PM

 

351. Enforcement and Regulatory Risks Facing CEOs, Managers and Physicians of Addiction Medicine Clinics
Robert Liles, JD, MBA, MS
Supported by: Liles Parker, Attorneys and Counselors at Law
Level of Instruction: All

Marketing activities that would normally qualify as ordinary business courtesies if extended to an actual or potential source of referrals in other industries, are often illegal in the context of Federal health business programs. In this session, we will discuss whether a number of common marketing practices comply with Stark and the Federal Anti-kickback Statute. We will also examine various State laws that must be considered before an addiction treatment center engages in marketing.

Saturday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

 

352. Improve Your Bottom Line by Proving How Effective Your Treatment Is
Joanna Conti, BS, MS
Supported by: Vista Research Group, Inc.
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Is your program getting squeezed by declining payer reimbursements and higher healthcare plan deductibles? Break out of the race for survival by proving how effective your program is on the metric that matters most – how many of your patients are in active recovery one year post-treatment? Strong results will allow you to attract more clients, negotiate higher reimbursement rates and take advantage of exciting valuebased contracting opportunities. Benchmarking data and learnings from the 2018 Outcomes Summit will be discussed.

 

353. Violence in Relationships
Brenda Westberry, MS
Supported by: Westberry Consulting
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Many offenders react with violence due to a lack of developed coping skills and strategies to handle problems in an effective way. It can be said that drugs and alcohol often precipitates further acts of violence and treatment programs within the community often work against acceptance of violent offenders based on their past histories. In this workshop, we will examine the foundation of violence and the impact on domestic violent offenders who move from corrections into the community and the relationship between intimate partner violence, substance use and violent behavior. This workshop will also examine social factors which perpetuate intimate partner abuse and the impact domestic violence has on victims, the perpetrators and the community. Attention is given to the adoption of best practices in screening, assessing and safety planning for individuals involved in violent relationships and will identify prevention strategies.

 

354. Clinical Psychopharmacology for Therapists
Aldo Morales, MD, FASAM
Supported by: Retreat Premier Addiction Treatment Centers
Level of Instruction: All

An overview of our pharmacopeia for the management of psychiatric disorders, intended for mental health providers who may or may not have a background in the biological sciences.

 

355. Medical Cannabis and Addiction Medicine Practice Consequences, Part II
Jonathan Allen, MD,
Brian Hurley, MD, MBA, DFASAM
Supported by: Rushford & New England Chapters of ASAM
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

The prevalence of cannabis use increases in states that adopt medical marijuana laws. A firm understanding of the association between cannabis use and its impact on substance use disorder treatment and other medical disorders is critical to the practice of addiction medicine. This workshop follows and builds upon Dr. Hurley’s lunchtime didactic with further discussion addressing modern addiction medicine practices and implications for patients who use cannabis. Focus will be on case review and participants will be active involved in iterative discussion of these real-world clinical case scenarios. The workshop will emphasize practical clinical approaches clinicians can use when providing care to patients who use cannabis, including those who have been issued cards authorizing the possession and use of cannabis for purported medical indications.

 

356. Starting the Food, Body Conversation: Tools and Strategies for A Healthy Relationship
Jean Owen Curran, MS, RDN, LDN
Supported by: Eating Recovery Center
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Up to 35% of patients who struggle with substance abuse will exhibit eating disorder behaviors, and yet, so much more will leave treatment with an unhealthy relationship with their body and the food they put in it. How do we set our clients up to have a relationship with their body? Attendees will walk away from the presentation with practical, creative strategies to support and create a safe environment for those wanting to explore a healthy relationship with their body and the food they put in it. Furthermore, gaining tools on how to identify and screen when your client become susceptible to an eating disorder. Robyn candidly speaks about her personal experience of overcoming alcoholism and eating disorder. Her dynamic presentation style and storytelling are both educational and compelling and regularly receives overwhelmingly positive feedback from attendees representing various disciplines.

 

357. Tales from 20 years in the Detox trenches
Rick Campa, MD
Gwendolyn Casella
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This workshop provides a unique perspective on a wide variety of detox issues while addressing the many challenges that come with complicated detox cases. With over 39 combined years of experience in the detox trenches, the presenters offer their hardearned experience and education, in addition to humor, in this session geared toward addiction professionals. Attendees will be both entertained and informed on some littleknown tricks of the trade, including effective ways to keep clients safe, tips for maintaining a drug-free detox unit, and how to raise the industry standards of client care.

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

Saturday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

 

375. Spiritual Self-care in Trauma Informed Treatment and Clinical Supervision
Jack Abel, MDiv, SEF
Stan Bumgarner, MDiv, LADACII
Supported by: Caron Treatment Centers & Cumberland Heights
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Trauma and secondary trauma is our everyday reality, we live and work in the midst of it.

SAMHSA’s protocol for Trauma-Informed Care incorporates spirituality explicitly in selfcare and notes that “a strong sense of spiritual connection can enhance counselors’ resilience and ability to cope.” Commitment to spiritual self care in clinical practice and supervision is essential to the health and well being of clinicians. Our spiritual health affects our clients and their families.

This workshop focuses on learning skills to stay spiritually healthy as you work with traumatized clients and their families. We will provide resources and methods and encourage significant participant interaction to practice skills in this area, learning to better attend to meaning, purpose, belonging, identity, heritage, and hope in patient and supervisory care.

 

376. Drinking, Drug Use and Addiction in the Autism Community
Elizabeth Kunreuther, MSW LCSWA, LCASA
Level of Instruction: All

Studies suggest individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a higher risk of developing substance use disorder (SUD) than the general population. Currently, 1 in 68 individuals is diagnosed with ASD. Adult outcomes for those with ASD are poor. The presentation provides an overview of ASD in adolescents and adults, common misconceptions regarding independent adults with ASD such as a disinterest in alcohol/drugs, an aversion to social environments where drinking/drug use may occur, the use of substances as a means of coping, the behavioral and genetic connections between ASD and addiction, and late diagnosis of ASD and its possible connection to addiction. The presentation will end with recommended diagnostic and treatment options.

 

377. Gender Responsive Treatment Approaches for Adult Women Throughout the Continuum of Care
Mary Anne Roy, PsyD, CCS
Supported by: Crossroads
Level of Instruction: All

This workshop presents a framework for a gender responsive treatment approach for adult women with substance use disorders. A significant percentage of women presenting for substance use treatment often report a history of trauma as well as difficulty in developing and maintaining meaningful, healthy and sustaining relationships. Shame and fear of severe consequences may result in the denial or minimization of the existence of a problem. This in addition to society’s stereotypes of women, often result in women remaining stuck in their substance use longer. These experiences further reinforce the importance of providing gender responsive and trauma informed treatment approaches. This workshop will discuss specific treatment needs of women across the various levels of care while also describing specific clinical interventions to facilitate women’s substance use treatment.

 

378. Co-Occurring Illness in Young Adults: Thought Disorders and Substance Use
Ashley Kelly, LPC MAC CACII
Supported by: Skyland Trail
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

This presentation will focus on the challenge of working with young adults who are experiencing their first episode of a thought disorder and who have a history of using mood-altering substances. Utilizing case studies to demonstrate, the signs and symptoms of the major thought disorders will be reviewed with particular attention given to differentiating from the signs and symptoms of substance/medication induced psychotic disorders and the signs and symptoms of substance withdrawal. The importance of developing a timeline of psychotic symptoms and of substance use, the age of onset of the prodrome and the first use of substances, and the symptoms that occurred during times when the client was clean and sober will be emphasized. The role of the family in treatment and ongoing support, the role of abstinence and the importance of 12 Step program involvement in the client’s ongoing management of their recovery will be stressed.

 

379. Multidisciplinary Treatment in Today’s Healthcare System
Neeraj Gandotra, MD
Scott Dehorty, LCSW-C
Marc Romano, PsyD, PMHNP, BC, CAP, LHRM
Supported by: Maryland House Detox, Delphi Behavioral Health Group
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

The presentation will discuss the history of the use of a Multidisciplinary Team approach to client care in the mental healthcare. The benefits of using this type of approach to client care will be discuss as well as those issues that hinder the use of a Multidisciplinary Team in today’s healthcare environment. A case presentation will be used to discuss how each of the following disciplines would traditionally contribute to client care using a Multidisciplinary Team approach, Psychiatry, Psychology, Social Work, Nursing, and Para-Professional. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of the current blurring of lines among disciplines and the viability of the Multidisciplinary Team approach.

 

380. Non Self-Abandonment: Cultivating the “Pause” for Meaningful Recovery
Alison Camhi, LMFT
Supported by: La Ventana Treatment Programs
Level of Instruction: All

Relapse, it is said, is a process, not an event. Clients are often able to recite an understanding of their triggers and relapse prevention skills learned in treatment. Unanticipated emotional vulnerabilities can undermine Clients abilities to use relapse prevention skills. This workshop provides a practical framework and interventions for clinicians to help clients build a somatic & to acknowledge and describe or identify their internal experience and move beyond reactive behavior to a grounded, skillful and sober response. Interventions can be used with DBT module skills at different phases of recovery. This workshop is geared towards therapists, interventionists, counselors, supervisors, program administrators and other stakeholders providing direct care to clients struggling with addiction.

Saturday Evening Lobster Bake

7:00 PM – 9:30 PM

 

 

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7:00 AM – 8:00 AM NA Just For Today – Morning Meditation Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
7:30 AM – 10:30 AM Exhibit Hall Hours
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM Onsite Registration Hours in Barnstable II

New England Chapters of ASAM and American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP) Business Meeting

8:00 AM – 8:45 AM

Join the New England Chapters of ASAM and AAAP Combined Annual Regional Business Meeting. Come meet other physicians working in the field of addiction medicine/psychiatry and share regional issues and triumphs. All physicians are encouraged to join us for a delicious complimentary breakfast and discussion – (AAAP members/ASAM members/other physicians only)

Sunday Morning Workshops

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

400. The Human Fire Extinguished – the Unavoidable Rise of Burnout
Philippe Wuyts, MD
Supported by: iCCAD & The Gruben Charitable Foundation
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

In this workshop we will look in to the reasons for the current increase in burnout syndrome prevalence on a global level. Starting off presenting data from research into the prevalence of burnout, we will continue with a discussion of its complex psychopathology and development over time. We will look into how chronic stress leads to the emergence of symptoms and eventually burnout. We will look into the differences with compassion fatigue syndrome. Finally, we will engage in a broader discussion on how important changes (globalisation, automation and technology ao) in modern society are contributing to the rise of burnout pathology.

NE ASAM/AAAP Sunday Morning Workshop

9:00 AM – 9:45 AM

 

401. Group Therapy in the Modern Age: Technology, Tradition, and Evidence-Based Practice
Rocco Iannucci, MD
Supported by: American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP), New England Chapters of ASAM & McLean Hospital
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

This 45-minute talk is sponsored by the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry, as part of the combined AAAP-/ ASAM- sponsored breakfast session. The session will begin with a brief historical perspective reviewing major developments in group-based approaches as they evolved over the years. The evidence base for group psychotherapy in treatment of substance use disorders, with and without co-occurring conditions, will be surveyed. The theory, practice, and relative evidence of common approaches will be compared. Finally, recent developments in the concept of a group will be presented, with a focus on the impact of technology on group interventions. Innovative approaches will be discussed, presenting both empirical support and the presenter’s personal experiences in implementing such new methods.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Sunday Closing Plenary

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

 

425. Moving from Trauma Informed to Trauma Focused Care: A Mindfulness Based Multi Modal Approach
Stephen Dansiger, PSYD, MFT
Supported by: Refuge Recovery Treatment Centers
Level of Instruction: All

Addictions treatment has come a long way over the centuries, particularly since the advent of Alcoholics Anonymous of 80 years ago. For the past 2,600 years, Buddhist Mindfulness and the therapies and practices it has brought about have contributed to psychological and spiritual relief to millions of people. Over the last 25 years, our understanding and the treatment of trauma related disorders and difficulties have progressed, with Francine Shapiro’s development in EMDR therapy. The understanding of the link between traumatic experiences and the difficulties and suffering of alcoholics and addicts have grown. SAMSHA and other clinical bodies have indicated the need for additions treatment to follow the principles of trauma-informed care. This presentation will make clear the theory and research behind the development and implementation of both mindfulness and EMDR Therapy through case studies and anecdotal evidence of how this model is progressing, with recommendations for further research and practice.

Afternoon Break for Intensive Learning Attendees

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

Sunday Intensive Learning Workshops

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

 

500. The Undertow of Addiction: What Lies Beneath the Surf
Audrey Freshman, PhD, MSW, CASAC
Supported by: Adelphi University School of Social Work
Level of Instruction: All

What lies beneath the psychological surface that might suggest the risk of substance use disorder? Using a developmental model, this presentation will highlight vulnerable points of potential trauma along the trajectory from birth to late adolescence that can set the stage for future substance use disorder. Supported by research studies, this model will consider the inter-generational transmission of trauma and highlight the role of genetics and epigenetics in the early transmission of vulnerability to PTSD and addiction. The discussion will incorporate the need for assessment of adverse childhood experiences (ACE study), and will consider the role of attachment theory and self-regulation as mediators of the potential for future disturbances in separation/individuation in adolescence which can become manifested through addictive disorder.

 

501. A Multi-Faceted Approach to Cravings Management
Doug Paul, LPC, CPCS
Supported by: Mt. Sinai Wellness Center
Level of Instruction: All

The DSM 5 added “cravings” to the criteria for substance use disorders in October, 2015. Just as addiction can impact every area of life, so too must the approach for cravings management. The goals for this workshop will be to review the literature on cravings management techniques, discuss cravings management medications and elicit a discussion of multi-faceted approaches that have worked for those on the front lines of SUD treatment. This dynamic presentation is both experiential and educational with the use of mixed-media and pop-culture references.

 

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  • CCSAD is a wonderful conference bringing together addiction professionals of all types in one large collaborative setting. It has become an absolute must for me each year and provides excellent quality and value for continuing medical education.


  • This event was one of the most informative learning experiences I've ever had in my 28 years of work!


  • The Cape Cod Symposium is a primary source of new information and new developments in the field of addiction. It is my most important professional development activity every year. The reputation of the conference seems to just keep getting better and better. See you in September.


  • I have gone to many conferences in my over 30 years in the addiction field and I can say I like this one the best. It was professional people with great, knowledge, insights, and experiences getting together and sharing and supporting each other. That to me is what it is all about.


  • I look forward to this conference every year. I always leave with a full tool bag and a renewed confidence in new and exciting ways to take care of those suffering from addictions!


  • CCSAD continues to be the premier training and education event for the addiction field because it does so well what others try to do, but fall short. It provides the opportunity for the frontline practitioner and administrator to experience gold standard, relevant, challenging, thought-provoking, and meaningful content, while also offering unique networking opportunities that are both fun and renewing for the spirit. One simply can't do better!


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