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2020 agenda will be available in May. The 2019 agenda can be viewed below.

 

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM NA Just For Today – Morning Meditation Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in Bass River Foyer for Learning Intensive Attendees
7:00 AM – 7:00 PM Onsite Registration Hours
7:45 AM – 12:00 PM Fred French Golf Scramble
8:30 AM – 5:00 PM Intensive Learning Workshops
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM Opening Plenary

Building and Sustaining a Successful Sober Home Business

8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

 

100. Building and Sustaining a Successful Sober Home Business – Best Practices for Sober Home Management (6 NAADAC Credit Only)
 
Supported by: One Step, Mountainside, Transcend Recovery Community, Red Rock Recovery Center, Camelback Recovery, The Lighthouse Sober Living and Recovery 365, Salt Life Sober Living, Shoreline Recovery, Florida Association of Recovery Residences, MASH, Grace House for Women, Aware Recovery Care, Brandeis University, Haven at Pismo, Vermont Recovery Network & Farmview Homes
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate
 
C4 Recovery Foundation is offering a full-day of learning and discussion for sober home owners professionals with the following topics:

How and Why You Should Measure Outcomes of Your Sober Living Program
John Lehman
Michael McGee, MD
Jennifer Miles, PhD
Daniel Smith, CAC
Moderated by Eva Hibnick

Best Practices in Engaging Alumni
Chris Connors
James Rhoads
Whit Smith
Moderated by Eva Hibnick

The Benefits of Peer Support Specialists and Recovery Coaching
Sarah Coupe
Trey Laird
Zachary Miller, MA, MCAP, CRRA
Fawn Montanye
Jason Snook
Moderated by Eva Hibnick

How to Avoid Conflict With Your Community: Best Practices on Working With Your State, Neighbors and Zoning Board
Karen Ablondi, MPH, LMSW, LADC
Steve Farnsworth
Larissa Matzek, MM
Tim Westbrook, MS
Moderated by Eva Hibnick

Thursday Intensive Learning All Day Workshops

8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

 

105. Professional Nursing Track for Addictions Education (6 CE/CME)
Donna White, RN, PhD, CNS, CADAC II,LADC I,CARN, CCFT, CCFE
James Lewis Fenley, MD
Ben Sullivan, MA, LADC I
William Carrick, RN, MSN, CARN
Jake Nichols, PharmD, MBA
Kevin Davis, MS, LADC I, CCFC
Maria Tricarico, RN, BSN, MA
Supported by: DMH Master Trainer – MA MGH Institute of Health Professions, SMA Behavioral Health Care & Executive Recovery Coach, Inc, and High Point Treatment Center
Level of Instruction: All

The following is a Track of Continuing Education specifically geared towards Professional Nurses who are interested in increasing their knowledge of Addictive Disorders. The domains included in this track are Physiology of Addictions, Health Sequelae, Pharmacology of Medication Assisted Treatment of Substance Use Disorders and related Public Health issues, Drug Diversion and Addictions related legal ramifications within the Profession of Nursing. The education provided in this Track is also applicable to the Continuing Education Requirements for the Addictions Nursing Certification (CARN).

The day long (6 continuing hours) session will include:

  • The Brain: Epigenetics, Neuroplasticity, and the Neurobiological Connection Between Chronic PTSD and Opioid Use Disorder
  • Treatment Options and Levels of Care – Accessing Help in the Current Healthcare System
  • Supervised Home-Based Detox Protocols
  • Neurobiology of Addiction and Pharmacology of MAT Updated Treatment Options
  • The Use of Section 25 for Alcohol and Substance Abuse Treatment
  • Creating an Addiction Consult Team in a Hospital Setting – Why It’s Critical to Support Patients and Staff

 

106. Healing Emotional Wounds Through Storytelling Using Psychodrama (6 CE/CME)
Mary Bellofatto, MA, LMHC, NCC, CEDS, CP, TEP
Supported by: Onsite Workshops
Level of Instruction: All

Stories need to be told. Trauma touches every human being and it is impossible to heal what we are unable to acknowledge. Emotions are the barometer of credibility and authenticity. Psychodrama is a useful tool in the healing of emotions and finding new possibilities beyond the trauma. Storytelling through psychodrama helps clients access both hemispheres of the brain. The left brain holds memories and information of cause and effect reasoning, verbal processing, linear thinking, and puts words into feeling states and perceptions. The right brain or non-linear, holistic (big picture) thinking, is where we store intense emotion, body sense, social awareness, and interprets non-verbal communication, image, theme, and sense of personal self. The communication needed to assess and share a coherent narrative requires that both sides work together. Psychodrama allows clients to access a greater number of appropriate roles, helping them re-own and recapture the disconnected and disowned part of their self.

 

107. Recovery Connections – Stages of Nurturing for an Integrated Journey (6 CE/CME)
Jonathan De Carlo, CAC III
Michael Dinneen, LCSW, CSAT, CAC III
Supported by: C4 Consulting, Inc.
Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This experiential workshop will help attendees develop tools to help the people they serve from stage I to stage II recovery. True connection and intimacy cannot be fully realized without healthy attachment. Facilitators will describe the process of healing relationships and growing spiritually through experiential therapies such as EFT (Emotionally Focused Therapy) attachment work. As a robust recovery maintenance approach, increased resiliency and dynamic wellness emerge in the therapy process. EFT is a systems approach and contemporary treatment approaches show greater success when systemic issues are addressed, specifically through attachment work from the beginning of recovery. The greater attention given to understanding family systems-based attachment work for clients, the greater likelihood for clarity of relapse trigger identification, stabilization of recovery across the client support system, yielding an integrated and diversified recovery growth. Attendees will develop insight into integrating traditional recovery modalities and attachment work through experiential exercises and practice throughout this workshop to further their own professional development and wellness.

Thursday Intensive Learning Morning Workshops

8:30 AM – 12:00 PM

 

125. Working with Criminal Justice Involved Women (3 CE/CME)
Brenda Westberry, MS
Supported by: Westberry Consulting

Level of Instruction: All

Women continue to enter the Criminal Justice System at an alarming rate for non-violent crimes. There are now more than 200,000 women behind bars and more than one million on probation and parole. Many women struggle with substance abuse, mental illness and histories of sexual and physical abuse. Very few of these women seek and receive the services that they need. Professionals working with this population must incorporate an integrated system of care that utilizes a multifaceted approach in the assessing, diagnosing, service planning, treatment and aftercare to influence successful outcomes with justice involved women. We will explore the impact that violence, prostitution and trauma have played in the lives of justice involved women. Attention is given to young women, older women, women as victims, women with disabilities and women with children. We will also review evidence-based strategies, priorities and expectations in the approach to working with criminal justice involved women.

Morning Break in the Bass River Foyer

10:00AM – 10:30AM

Thursday Intensive Learning Afternoon Workshops

1:30 PM – 5:00 PM

 

 

150. Complex Cases Facing Drug Courts: Understanding Current Issues and Challenges of Drug and Other Specialty Courts (3 CE/CME)
Roberta Leis, MPA, MED
Robert Ziemian
Brian Meyer, PhD, LCP
Tina Nadeau
Supported by: NEADCP, H.H. McGuire VA Medical Center & New Hampshire Superior Court

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

During this session, the panel will discuss several actual cases from New England Drug Court Programs involving participants who have struggled with drug court program requirements and whose behavior has been especially challenging for the drug court team to manage and address successfully. During the case review, drug court experts will discuss the appropriateness of sanctions, whether the team was considering all treatment options, and whether termination was appropriate. Using the framework participants will engage in discussion against the background of current issues, such as the opioid crisis, facing drug courts.

Hors d’oeuvres Networking Reception

5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Opening Plenary

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

 

199. The United States of Opioids: How the Government is Dealing with The Crisis Now, and What to Expect in The Coming Years (2 CE/CME)
Harry Nelson, JD
Supported by: Nelson Hardiman

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This presentation will speak to the national opioid crisis and how the United States government is reacting to the devastation of opioid abuse, opioid diversion, and overdose deaths in the context of in-depth look at current legislative activity as well as an assessment of what is to be expected.

 

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7:00 AM – 8:00 AM NA Just For Today – Morning Meditation Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open Al Anon meeting – Panel of Speakers
7:00 AM – 6:00 PM Onsite Registration Hours in Barnstable II
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
7:00 AM – 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall Hours
8:30 AM – 5:45 PM CCSAD Workshops
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM Friday Evening Documentary Screening

Friday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

200. Recovery from Alcohol and Other Drug Problems in a Nationally Representative Sample of U.S. Adults: Prevalence, Pathways, and Predictors (1.5 CE/CME)
John Kelly, PhD, ABPP
Supported by: MGH Recovery Research Institute

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Alcohol and other drug (AOD) misuse and related disorders confer a prodigious burden of disease, disability and premature mortality in middle and high-income countries globally. Understanding how individuals are successful at changing and sustaining salutary change with regard to AOD-related behaviors has become a clinical and public health priority in light of increases in alcohol and opioid harms and a rapidly changing policy landscape regarding the legal status of marijuana. This talk examines these global challenges with presentation of results from the first nationally representative study of US adults who have successfully resolved a significant AOD problem highlighting national recovery prevalence estimates, the variety of recovery pathways used, recovery identity, number of prior recovery attempts needed to resolve an AOD problem, and changes in indices of quality of life and functioning with time in recovery.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Friday Mid Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

 

225. Drug Court/Jail Collaboration: Special Considerations for Opioid Agonist Treatment for Justice-Involved Populations (1.5 CE/CME)
Roberta Leis, MPA, MEd
Andy Klein, PhD
Linda Hurley, PhD
Robert Ziemian
Supported by: NEADCP, Advocates for Human Potential, Inc., CODAC Behavioral Healthcare

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Often overlooked by practitioners, researchers and others are the special needs of persons with opioid use disorder involved in the criminal justice system. This population is comprised primarily of polydrug abusers, with high needs and limited resources, often reliant on Medicaid funding. These special circumstances and needs particularly come into play in terms of the application of medication-assisted treatment, making conventional MAT programming problematic and potentially harmful if not carefully and appropriately implemented for this population. The workshop will present examples of MAT programming for this population that works; both the promise and pitfalls learned in introducing MAT for this population in drug courts as well as prisons and jails. We will also present on the latest research on the challenges medical providers face in continuing the care of this population after release from the justice system.

 

226. Stages of Change for Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Conditions (1.5 CE/CME)
Deb Kuzmin, LCSW, CTFCB
Supported by: Origins Behavioral HealthCare

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Can individuals be treated successfully for co-occurring disorders and substance use disorders when they present to treatment but do so unwillingly or without commitment? Here we explore the possibilities, myths and stages of change, and successful techniques of meaningful engagement, communication and collaboration with the patient. Participants will discover through small groups and their own interactions in proposed case studies, Motivational Interviewing techniques and the clinician’s own style and practice of empathy and listening. Learn how the vital communications link between clinician and patient is forged in initial meetings. Participants will learn the efficacy of collaborative planning in individual treatment and relapse prevention. We examine quadrants of co-occurring disorders, relapse, cyclical learning and hope, and the role of holistic therapies and spirituality in treatment. The successful navigation of stages of change are presented in individualized, longer treatment and the realization of an individual’s authentic goals.

 

227. Defining the Characteristics of Eating and Substance Use Disorder Comorbidity (1.5 CE/CME)
Pamela Alba, MA, LMFT
Johnny Williamson, MD
Supported by: Timberline Knolls

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

This presentation will define and explain the characteristics of individuals presenting with eating disorders and substance abuse comorbidity. It will help participants understand the shared similarities between addiction and eating disorders in both diagnosis and clinical presentation. The role of trauma in eating disorders/substance abuse comorbidity will be explained. In addition, evidence-based best practices will be reviewed when treating this population.

 

228. Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder: Embracing Buprenorphine in an Abstinence-Based Treatment Program (1.5 CE/CME)
Randall Dwenger, MD
Amy Sedgwick, MS, LADC
Supported by: Mountainside Treatment Center

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Given the extent and impact of the opioid crisis, sometimes treatment-as-usual for Opioid Use Disorder is just not enough. The presenters outline an approach for addressing stigma and providing education to staff and clients to facilitate a cultural shift from an abstinence-based model. The presenters will review the various types of Medication Assisted Treatment for OUD, will discuss research and outcomes, as well as share experiences in promoting an organization-wide cultural shift with an emphasis on the notion that treatment is not a one-size-fits-all approach.

 

229. Utilizing Harm Reduction to Promote The Continuum Of Care For People Who Use Drugs (1.5 CE/CME)
Mark Jenkins
J. Craig Allen MD, FASM
Supported by: Greater Hartford Harm Reduction Coalition Inc. & Rushford Center

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Participants will learn that Harm Reduction is becoming increasingly central to people’s ability to live with or recover from substance use and eliminating barriers to drug user health. The prevention paradigm continues to shift to increasingly allow practices once inconceivable to accepted. We will demonstrate many such practices as they are being presently incorporated into best practice and discuss the positive outcomes associated with them.

 

230. Sexual Violence and Opioid Use Disorder: Implications for Practice (1.5 CE/CME)
Barbara Herbert, MD, DFASAM
Supported by: New England Chapters of ASAM

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

The impact of a history of sexual violence on people with SUD is well described. But recent literature and anecdotal reports suggest that sexual violence occurs contemporaneously, frequently, and regularly in the lives of many – particularly cis-women, trans and queer people. Three major contributors to sexual violence include: loss of consciousness after use; involvement in implicit or explicit negotiations about sex for drugs; and negative attitudes/self-perception and stigma around sexuality. This workshop will review the current literature, refresh participants understanding of interventions after acute sexual assault and elicit shared experience of participants to improve the quality of care to vulnerable persons coming into “addiction” care. Increasing attention to and new programs for vulnerable people with OUD make improving care for this population particularly relevant. But as many people with OUD have polysubstance misuse and abuse, and the stigma and difficulty of discussing sexual violence obtains across all SUD and AUD, the tools discussed will extend across a range of disorders. Provider and participant response to this complex issue will be welcomed.

 

231. Providing a Trauma Responsive Approach in the Treatment of Women with Co-Occurring Disorders (1.5 CE/CME)
Mary Anne Roy, PsyD, CCS
Melanie Sosinski-Brown, LCSW, LADC, CCS
Supported by: Crossroads

Level of Instruction: All

When treating women with co-occurring disorders it is important to recognize the high prevalence of trauma and the need for a gender responsive approach. This session will focus on stages of trauma treatment and recovery. Present focused trauma symptom management will be reviewed as well as exploring activation states and de-escalation strategies. This session will also focus on what it means to truly integrate a gender responsive approach in the treatment of adult women.

Friday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

 

250. The Role of Spirituality in Promoting Recovery (1 CE/CME)
Michael McGee, MD
Supported by: The Haven at Pismo

Level of Instruction: All

A professional language is now evolving for addressing spiritual issue relevant to recovery in faith-neutral and faith-friendly ways. This keynote will briefly describe current clinical models of spirituality, review the evidence indicating efficacy of spiritually oriented interventions in promoting recovery, and describe clinically-responsible and sensitive ways of introducing spiritually-informed interventions into treatment to optimized outcomes.

Friday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

 

251. Treating Cognitive Distortions to Stop the Cycle of Criminality & Stimulant Use (1.5 CE/CME)
Jennifer Weaver-Breitenbecher, MA, CAGS, LMHC
Supported by: Polaris Counseling & Consulting, LLC

Level of Instruction: All

This workshop will discuss the relationship between stimulant use, cognitive distortions, and current rates of recidivism. The presenter will walk through common manifestations of criminal thought distortions that often arise when criminal offenders engage in substance abuse treatment. Participants will investigate and learn how common CBT and DBT techniques can be utilized to address these thought distortions and effectively treat substance use disorders in the offender population.

 

252. Medication Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder: Identifying Patients at Risk of Early Dropout (1.5 CE/CME)
Steven Proctor, PhD
Supported by: PRO Health Group

Level of Instruction: All

Medication treatment with methadone or buprenorphine is the gold standard of care for opioid addiction. Premature discharge, however, is a pervasive problem in medication treatment settings and is associated with numerous adverse outcomes. Specific reasons for premature discharge generally fall into two broad categories (i.e., patient- and program-initiated). Previous studies often fail to distinguish between different types of discharge reasons among patients who leave treatment early. The presenter will discuss logistic regression findings derived from two independent research studies using large naturalistic samples of 4,000+ patients treated with either methadone or buprenorphine at over 30 licensed opioid treatment programs located throughout the U.S. Type of medication and method of payment were predictive of differential reasons for leaving medication treatment early. Individually-tailored strategies to improve retention may be indicated for certain medication treatment patients. Implications for routine clinical practice and future research efforts will be discussed.

 

253. An Integrative Harm Reduction Therapy Approach to Addictions: Addressing the Roadblocks to Healing, Growth and Positive Change (1.5 CE/CME)
Andrew Tatarsky, PhD
Supported by: Center for Optimal Living

Level of Instruction: All

More than one-third of Americans struggle with problematic substance use and other risky or addictive behaviors, but they often are ambivalent about changing them, regardless of negative consequences. Research suggests that more than 80% of this group is not ready to take action around positive change yet over 90% of treatment programs are oriented to treat people who are motivated to take action. This workshop addresses that gap, offering a comprehensive psychobiosocial model for understanding and working with these behaviors across the entire spectrum of readiness to change through Integrative Harm Reduction Psychotherapy (IHRP), which can be immediately incorporated into your practice or organization.

 

254. Measuring Clinical Outcomes. The Importance of Why, the Integrity of What, and the Significance of How (1.5 CE/CME)
Antoinette Giedzinska, PhD
Supported by: Sierra Tucson

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Implementing Measurement-Based Care (MBC) into clinical practice is to use objective data to assess the impact of treatment throughout the treatment trajectory. Progress and outcome data derived through validated and standardized instruments may be used to inform treatment goals, monitor individual progress, and guide treatment planning. Although patients may report their growth and improvement subjectively, objective data can meaningfully contribute to treatment effectiveness. One of the key benefits of MBC is how such information can enhance clinical skills by engendering deeper therapeutic alliance and identifying risks related to treatment inertia or failure. MBC, based on the Donabedian Model, considers the importance of evaluating structure, process, and outcome in clinical practice whether at the individual private practice to the larger behavioral health organization. To highlight the feasibility and applicability of MBC, review of measurement-based care studies reported in the literature, in addition to examples of how MBC data are captured, processed, and implemented from Sierra Tucson’s own measurement-based care initiative, will be presented and discussed.

 

255. The Tangled Web of Eating Disorders and Substance Abuse (1.5 CE/CME)
Seda Ebrahimi, PhD
Supported by: Cambridge Eating Disorder Center

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Eating Disorders are complex mental health conditions. Not only do Eating Disorders have various medical symptoms and complications, but they are also often accompanied by other mental health disorders. The co-occurrence of Eating Disorders and Substance Use Disorders is high. Research indicates that up to 35% of individuals with Substance Use Disorders have a co-occurring eating disorder. They both share many similarities, resulting in a similarity in treatment approaches. This presentation will review the similarities and differences between them as well as discuss effective treatment approaches.

 

256. Opportunities for Engagement: Partnering to Battle the Opioid Overdose Crisis (1.5 CE/CME)
J. Craig Allen MD, FASM
Melissa Monroe, LPC
Supported by: New England Chapters of ASAM, Rushford Healthcare & Hartford Healthcare

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

In his role as Chair of the Addictions Clinical Counsel at Hartford Healthcare, Dr. Allen is working towards a standardized approach to identifying and intervening with patients who have SUDs. In this presentation, Dr. Allen presents the challenges and solutions to removing barriers and maximizing timely intervention and smooth transition of care to community providers. The talk highlights opportunities for community providers to leverage their SUD expertise in working with medical providers/hospitals/ healthcare systems in their local community.

 

257. It’s Been a Long Time Coming: The paradigm Shift in Addiction Treatment, from Medical Gaze to Psychotherapeutic Values (1.5 CE/CME)
Ross Ellenhorn, LICSW, PhD
Supported by: Ellenhorn

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Cracks in the medical model of addiction are forming, and that’s a good thing. It means the chance for greater creativity, treatment choice, and freedom in decisions on what to do about substances in one’s life. It potentially means a decrease in stigma, and a much more nuanced view of the use of substances. It fractures a cookie-cutter approach to the use of substances and the engagement in other habits, allowing for care, if desired, to be truly individualized. We are heading towards a paradigm shift. We can see the outlines of the next model, one based on psychotherapeutic values, a non-judgmental curiosity about why a person might engage in seemingly self-destructive behavior, a belief that a person is making the bests choices they can when they use, a total respect for the autonomy of the individual, and a firm belief that last change never happens through confrontation or coercion.

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

Friday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

 

275. The Challenges of Couples Therapy for Addiction: CRAFTing Attachment (1.5 CE/CME)
Mark Green, MD
Karen MacEnzie, LICSW
Supported by: Psych Garden

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Substance use imposes a threat to couples’ relationships likened to the betrayal of an affair. Resentment and hurt can build for both parties, worsen the addiction and doom a relationship. Connection, support and the reduction of stress are crucial for recovery but enabling can prolong the use. How should therapists navigate these complex issues? The past stance of postponing therapy until abstinence is attained leaves couples discouraged, in pain, and feeling alone and hopeless, all factors that could precipitate or increase substance use. This is wrong and inadequate and wastes an important, sometimes the most important, reason to change. We will introduce CRAFT (Community Reinforcement Approach – Family Therapy) and EFT (Emotionally Focused Therapy) and show how and when to use each to maximize successful engagement, motivation and recovery of the addicted person and their partner.

 

276. Sleep Disorders in People with Co-occurring Disorders (1.5 CE/CME)
Delia Hendrick, MD
Supported by: WestBridge

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Sleep Disorders are very common in people with co-occurring disorders and represent both a risk factor and a symptom of either disorders. Normal sleep will be reviewed, followed by sleep disorders, specifically as they correlate with substance use disorders and mental health conditions. Diagnoses will be reviewed to increase awareness on when to make referrals for specialized care, and interventions for improving sleep will be reviewed, especially interventions that are accessible to all care providers and clients themselves. Sleep disorders that will be reviewed are: insomnia, circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders, restless legs syndrome, and breathing-related sleep disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea. We will discuss the following interventions in the context of co-occurring disorders: sleep diary and sleep hygiene, bright light therapy, pharmacotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Information presented is based on peer-reviewed systematic reviews and literature.

 

277. One Recovery, Many Paths: How to Integrate Nature-Based Traditions into Your Treatment Plan (1.5 CE/CME)
Renee Baribeau
Supported by: Foundations Recovery Network

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Nature-based tradition practices can help patients navigate Long-Term Recovery. Participants in this workshop will receive an easy-to-use tool for developing a durable spiritual foundation. Pinpoint your bearings using a quick journey process, and quantify the experience using the provided Compass Model. The Four Cardinal Winds are persistent structures used for organizing human experience, as evidenced on early cave drawings worldwide. Renee overlaid symbols from seven ancient traditions to develop a user-friendly tool called the Awakening Compass. Better choices are made with accurate information, especially while developing the necessary spiritual foundation for sustainable recovery. Winds are synonymous with spirit in most religions. The mass exodus of church attendees over the past 40 years has produced a younger lost generation, so providing additional coping skills is essential. Nature-based faith practices offer people a direct and personal God experience. New Ancient Wisdom tools can help your patients embrace a structured spiritual experience.

 

278. The Neuroscience in Treating Family Systems: All Humans Are ‘Chemically Dependent’ (1.5 CE/CME)
Ward Blanchard, MA, LCAS, CSI
Supported by: The Blanchard Institute

Level of Instruction: All

Dating back to early 1900s, Substance Use Disorders have commonly been referred to as “family diseases.” Likewise, in today’s addiction industry, most treatment centers tout “family program services” as a standard available provision. However, the offered family curriculum in these programs and services is often outdated, inaccurate, or lacks the most modern neuroscience data and evidence. New research has discovered the devastating brain impact families endure once they experience the trauma of their loved ones SUDs and mental illness. This presentation reviews the most groundbreaking scientific findings on the neuroscience of family systems and how professionals and treatment centers can utilize this research and new strategies to effectively engage and treat individual and their family systems.

 

279. LGBTQ Substance Abuse: Supporting the Intricate Journey (1.5 CE/CME)
John Sovec, MA, LMFT
Supported by: John Sovec Therapy and Counseling
Level of Instruction: Intermediate

As LGBTQ clients approach sobriety, they may also come to terms with multiple facets of their own sexual orientation and gender identity in a straight privileged environment, which can often create pressures of internalized homophobia. This lessened self-esteem creates a view of the world that lacks safety, interrupts developmental phases, and deepens pressure to ” fit in.” As professionals working with this population an understanding can be cultivated as to how biases and agendas develop and how the pervasiveness of these constructs influences the therapeutic alliance. Even the most well-meaning clinician can find themselves making mistakes in communication, treatment planning, and community involvement that make it challenging for an LGBTQ client to feel safe and understood. Issues of sobriety, sexuality, gender, family dynamics and more will be explored in this highly interactive workshop that provides exploration, discussion, and tools to address these challenging issues.

 

280. Enhancing Motivation, MAT Adherence & Retention with Routine Use of Contingency Management (1.5 CE/CME)
Caitlyn Kjolhede,BS, BSN, RN
Michael Levy, PhD
Nicole McNeil, MSW, LICSW, PsyD
Celeste Rogers, LMHC
David Gastfriend, MD, DFASAM
Richard Kostigen
Supported by: New England Chapters of ASAM, D’Amore-McKim School of Business, Northeastern University & Gosnold

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

One of the most evidence-based, clinically-sound treatment approaches is Contingency Management (CM). Based on well-established theories of Operant Conditioning and Behavioral Economics, CM enhances relapse prevention, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and other approaches. In early recovery, CM increases attendance, retention, and abstinence. In this workshop, clinicians will learn how to improve skills by addressing: ethics (helping families/partners provide patients with motivational enhancement funds without enabling or policing), resources (obtaining funds from families, employers and payers), monitoring/testing (the frequency and rigor for increasing attendance and effective drug screening) and management (how to set, manage, and discuss CM reinforcement schedules and results in daily practice). Providers from all disciplines will learn how to incorporate into practice several technologies for improving motivation, MAT adherence, and treatment retention. Attendees will learn how to apply CM in various DSM-5 substance use disorders (from tobacco smoking to opioids), with multiple subpopulations (from pregnant women to criminal justice-involved returning citizens to corporate executives), and in various settings (including medical centers, intensive outpatient programs, recovery homes, and insurance programs).

 

281. Motivating the Substance Use and Eating Disorder Co-Occurring Patient (1.5 CE/CME)
Linda Lewaniak, LCSW, CAADC
Supported by: Eating Recovery Center/Insight

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

42.7% of those struggling with substance use disorder will also have a co-occurring disorder such as binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, mood, and anxiety. And yet, many of these individuals are either undiagnosed or not ready to confront another recovery process. There are many different stages of change when in the process of recovery: pre-contemplative, contemplative, and determination/pre-preparation. Linda Lewaniak, LCSW, CAADC guide the audience through motivational interviewing techniques to best support the client at the stage they are currently at in the recovery process. The tools outlined by Lewaniak include reflective listening, empathy, and developing discrepancies to best intervene and provide treatment options for the co-occurring population wherever they are at in the process.

Friday Evening Plenary

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

 

299. Change in Action (2 CE/CME)
Mark Pirtle, DPT
Supported by: “Is Your Story Making You Sick?” – A Lojong Production Film

Level of Instruction: All

The documentary film “Is Your Story Making You Sick?” chronicles eight people from all walks of life as they bravely confront their stories and work through a variety of stress-related illnesses including depression, anxiety, addictions, and PTSD. Like all people, these courageous participants carry the imprint of their past within their body-mind system. That imprint is their story. It determines their emotions and can even make them sick. Using a variety of psychotherapeutic modalities including ethics-based mindfulness, meditation, somatic experiencing, shamanic practices, shadow and dream work, and more, facilitators guide the group to higher perspectives, a new story, change, and healing. Expert interviews of Dr. Gabor Mate, Dr. Dan Siegel, Ellen Langer PhD, Carl Hart PhD, Bruce Lipton PhD, Dr. Lissa Rankin, Dr. Ann Marie Chiasson, Eric Garland PhD, and others, inject credible science into the narrative. Learn from one of the film’s program directors, Dr. Mark Pirtle. Take home an evidence-based framework for narrative medicine you can immediately use with your clients.

 

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7:00 AM – 8:00 AM NA Just For Today – Morning Meditation Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 6:00 PM Onsite Registration Hours in Barnstable II
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
7:00 AM – 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall Hours
8:30 AM – 5:45 PM CCSAD Workshops
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM Lobster Bake Dinner

Saturday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

300. The Internet is Made for Porn: Implications of the Pornification of Human Sexuality (1.5 CE/CME)
David Greenfield, PhD, MSCP
Supported by: Odyssey Behavioral Healthcare and The Center for Internet and Technology Addiction

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This workshop will review the roots of pornography and its long historical relationship with technology and how this marriage formed and thrived in recent decades. We will examine how pornography addiction is increased by the amplification of stimulating content via the Internet. There will be a deeper examination of the recent interrelationship of the Internet and digital technology with pornography and the implications for the use, abuse, and addiction to porn. We will address the complex issues in our culture regarding the schism between overt sexuality and sexualization juxtaposed with the covert shame, intoxication, and use of online pornography. Pornography risks normalizing unobtainable sexual feats by portraying an unrealistic and unattainable view of sexual behavior that is devoid of the intricacies and intimacies of human connection. We will also review the neurobiology of sex and pornography use, and we will explore the evolutionary biology of the hijacking of the mesolimbic pathways in process/behavioral addiction in regard to online sexual behavior and pornography. Clinical, medical, and treatment implications will be presented.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Saturday Mid Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

 

325. Trauma, Shame and Addiction: How Did We Get Here? How Do We Change? (1.5 CE/CME)
Donald Sansom, DO
Supported by: Sierra Tucson

Level of Instruction: All

As the opioid epidemic continues to unfold on the American landscape and with alcohol related deaths ranking as the third leading cause of preventable death in the U.S. Addiction is now a public health concern of epic proportions. What about the undercurrents to addiction, the things that frequently start addiction, that fuel addiction? What about the undertreated public health menace that directly impacts and precedes addiction, and negatively affects the health and longevity of individuals and families? This silent menace is trauma, especially trauma from childhood. Untreated trauma leads to the failure of so many individuals who find themselves chronically relapsing into the spiral of opioid addiction, alcohol use disorder gambling and sex addiction, to name a few. The presenter will share successes in treating the underpinnings to addiction itself from an epigenetic, genetic, and psychosocial perspective focused on a truly trauma-informed approach.

 

326. Trauma Integrated Addiction Treatment: What Is It? What Should It Look Like? (1.5 CE/CME)
Michael Barnes, PhD, MAC, LPC
Supported by: Foundry Treatment Center

Level of Instruction: All

No matter who you speak to in the addiction treatment world, they will tell you that they do trauma informed or trauma integrated treatment. But what does that mean and what should that look like? This presentation will offer a developmental model and a set of axioms that can be utilized in the development of effective trauma integrated treatment. The Neuro Affective Relational Model (NARM) will be proposed as a central organizing theory for assisting clients to work simultaneously with achievement of addiction milestones and resolution of day-to-day trauma symptoms. NARM is a treatment model designed to address developmental trauma, based on somatic psychotherapy, attachment theory and regulation of the autonomic nervous system. NARM developmental themes of connection to self and others, attunement to needs, trusting self and others, autonomy and boundary setting, and the ability for love/sexuality will be highlighted.

 

327. Borderline Personality Disorder and Co-Occurring Disorders: Effective Treatment for a Complex Client (1.5 CE/CME)
Melissa O’Neill, MSW, LCSW
Supported by: Center for Discovery

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

We now know that along with accompanying mood disorders, 78 percent of adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) will develop a substance disorder or addiction at some point. Understanding and addressing this complex comorbidity can make treating these clients less overwhelming. In this workshop, we’ll explore how personal biases toward clients with BPD can affect diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes. Through experiential exercises and case studies, learn a range of evidenced-based practices, including practical strategies from DBT and ACT, for treating this complex diagnosis.

 

328. Finding Purpose in Recovery Through Personalized Educational and Vocational Support (1.5 CE/CME)
Kami Dexter, EdD
Supported by: Launch Centers

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

This workshop explores the essential integration of purpose-driven educational and vocational behaviors in the clinical process. There will be a focus on the creation of integrated goal-setting that incorporates college and/or career including self-regulation, motivation, self-sufficiency, contributing skills and talents, organization, time management and life balance. Practical results-oriented steps in achieving work and school goals throughout the first 180 days of recovery and beyond will be explored as well. The workshop will be broken down into (5) 15-minute sections with interactive questions and discussion in between and after. I: Introduce and describe integrative approach and provide background and rationale. II: Describe specific educational components in treatment. III: Describe specific vocational components in treatment. IV: Provide (5) case studies with diagnosis, integrated treatment plan, treatment process, and follow-up/results. V: Address barriers and struggles and discuss areas of focus for future research and practice.

 

329. Nutrition for Addiction Recovery: Exploring Links Between the Gut and Brain (1.5 CE/CME)
David Wiss, MS RDN
Supported by: Nutrition in Recovery

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

The utilization of nutrition services in addiction treatment has not been standardized, but there is a growing trend towards incorporating registered dietitian nutritionists into the treatment team. This presentation places particular emphasis on gut health, microbiome, and associated neural interactions. Homeostatic and hedonic mechanisms of eating behavior are discussed in the context of eating disorders and food addiction. In summarizing the available published evidence on human subjects, a case is made for both individual nutrition counseling and group education, as well as the implementation of food service guidelines in treatment settings. Given the current opioid crisis, consideration should be given to prioritizing efforts to improve eating habits and overall health in recovery programs. By promoting positive recovery outcomes, nutrition may reduce costs and improve resource allocation. Public health measures promoting nutrition standards in treatment settings should be implemented. Guidelines for nutrition interventions will be proposed, and a summary of where more information is needed will point towards future directions.

 

330. Early Career Physician Outreach Towards Addiction Medicine (1.5 CE/CME)
Samuel Silverman, MD, DFASAM, FAPA
Vincent McClain, MD
Supported by: New England Chapters of ASAM & Rushford Center

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Physicians have little exposure to Addition Medicine. The ASAM Educational is a unique
way to address this barrier. Over the past 6 years, CT-ASAM has organized an annual competition among all physicians in their medical training. Medical students, residents and fellows have been among the participants. The competition requires a 10-slide presentation on the impact of addiction on your training and what you’ve been able to do or learn about it. Each entrant gets an honorarium for submitting. Monetary prizes are awarded. The submissions are reviewed by the ASAM members and the competition is held at our Annual ASAM meeting. The workshop will discuss the process of implementation and previous entrants/winners will present their slides and comment. The ASAM Educational is a collaborative effort with the Connecticut State Medical Society, ASAM and the two Addiction Medicine Fellowships in Ct (Rushford and Yale).

 

331. Skills and Strategies for Leveling the Utilization Review Playing Field (1.5 CE/CME)
Elizabeth Irias, MS, LMFT
Supported by: Clearly Clinical

Level of Instruction: All

Between the years of 1999 and 2016, the rate of drug overdose deaths tripled in the United States (CDC, 2017), and the national suicide rate increased 28% (NIMH, 2018). Thousands are in need of appropriate and medically-necessary mental health treatment, and insurance authorizations are part of this equation…lives depend on our client advocacy skills. This engaging presentation provides critical strategies to improve concurrent review outcomes in an ethically- and legally-sound manner. As a result of implementing the methods, providers report an improvement in the length of treatment authorizations by 15% to 20%, as well as improvements in overall clinical documentation quality and auditing outcomes. This presentation offers key information about managed care systems and Utilization Review-related laws, including the effect of clinical documentation on auditing results (“If it’s not in the chart, it didn’t happen”) and sentinel incident or legal investigations. Join this presentation to sharpen your skills and better help your clients in need.

Saturday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

 

350. The ABC’s of Hep C (1 CE/CME)
Anthony Martinez, MD
Supported by: New England Chapters of ASAM

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

The tragic story of U.S. opioid overdose deaths is the highly visible end of the opioid epidemic. In the shadows lies Increased injection drug use which has led to a growing incidence of blood-borne infections including bacteria that cause heart and bone infections (endocarditis and osteomyelitis), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and hepatitis B and C. There are nearly 2.4 million Americans living with hepatitis C and new infection rates have more than tripled since 2010 primarily among adults under 40. Although expert recommendations call for HCV treatment among people who inject drugs to prevent HCV transmission, many barriers exist including stigma, psychosocial factors, and misconceptions concerning HCV treatment.

Saturday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

 

351. Moving in Recovery (1.5 CE/CME)
Meri Shadley, PhD, MFT, LCADC, LCS
Kelli Grock, MS, MFT, LCADC, CYI
Supported by: University of Nevada, Reno’s Center for the Application of Substance Abuse Technologies

Level of Instruction: All

Families are often left devastated and dramatically altered by addiction’s impact. While individuals may experience recovery, the family structure and attachments are often impaired. Research suggests that it is critical that all family members receive the benefit of the many new methods for healing. We propose that when mind-body-spirit approaches are utilized within individual and family sessions, long-term recovery is enhanced. Employing more nonverbal and experiential techniques allows emotional connections in families to strengthen and organizing patterns to shift. By assimilating the fundamentals of the recovery philosophy of surrender, acceptance, and responsibility to self and others with the core essence of awareness and consciousness via yogic postures relational healing occurs. This workshop shows how movement-oriented methods pave a path for an integrating of individual and system therapies within a 12-Step paradigm.

 

352. Integrative Therapies as Powerful Adjuncts in Substance Abuse Treatment (1.5 CE/CME)
Loretta Butehorn, PhD, CCHT
Marcia Tanur, MD
Supported by: Sidewalk Clinic

Level of Instruction: Introductory

This presentation will give an overview of Integrative Health Modalities (previously referred to as complementary medicine or alternative therapies) as defined by the National Institute of Health and identify which are used for specific stages of treatment and recovery (detox, post-acute withdrawal, early and long term recovery). Acupuncture and homeopathy will be explored in greater depth using pre- and post-treatment videos. All presented work will be accompanied by extensive research bibliography.

 

353. When You Can’t Keep Your Eye on The Ball: ADHD, Addiction, and Not Losing Sight of The Bigger Picture (1.5 CE/CME)
Constant Mouton, MD, FCPsychSA
Supported by: iCAAD and The Gruben Charitable Foundation

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

People with ADHD have a two to three times higher risk of developing substance use disorder. Twenty to forty percent of adults with ADHD have a history of substance use disorders. In a group of patients admitted for addiction treatment, 15%-25% will have ADHD, often still undiagnosed. Failure to diagnose and treat people with ADHD put them at risk of developing additional mental, physical and psychosocial problems. What is the actual addiction potential of prescription medicines? How does ADHD affect addiction and vice versa? What are the psychological implications on the patients and the family? The presentation will focus on diagnosing and treating ADHD and addiction. Using case-studies and the example of an integrated approach, Dr Mouton will elaborate on using best-practice, evidence-based models to treat people suffering from this COD. The presentation will provide insights and practical tips on this bio-psycho-social-cultural-spiritual approach and outline its impact on families.

 

354. Harm Reduction for Patients Prescribed Buprenorphine: Is It Possible? (1.5 CE/CME)
Laura Kehoe, MD, MPH, FASAM
Supported by: New England Chapters of ASAM & Massachusetts General Hospital

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

The hallmark of addiction is loss of control and ongoing compulsive substance use despite negative consequences and is underscored by significant difficulty in executive functioning and organization. As such, highly structured treatment modalities and scheduling are unrealistic for many at best, and potentially lethal for others at worst. If late or missed appointments or ongoing substance use result in delays, discharge from care, or referral to a higher level of care when the patient is not able or ready to make such a change, the result can be no level of care. Fentanyl analogues have dramatically changed the landscape of the crisis, requiring more flexible care models to keep people engaged in care while lowering their risk of serious health complications or overdose, and increasing their chances of continuing meaningful, patient centered treatment just as we do with other chronic, relapsing illnesses. This is the practice of harm reduction.

 

355. Integrated Somatic Strategies for Emotional Regulation and Resiliency (1.5 CE/CME)
Andrew Sidoli, MSW, LCSW, CADAC
Supported by: True North Behavioral Health

Level of Instruction: Introductory

This session is intended as an experiential, multi-sensory journey to explore various states of regulation and dysregulation. We will examine awareness of amygdala activation (brain burn) and how limbic system states shape our internal narrative and cognitive framework. Attendees will begin to understand the relational impact of unmet expectations with self and others and how that awareness together with our senses is in fact a strategy to enable the shift back to prefrontal cortex.

 

356. Now What? Integrated Business Management for Behavioral Health (No CE/CME)
Jonathan De Carlo, CAC III
Christopher Bennett, CIP, BRI-I, CADC-II
Supported by: C4 Consulting, Inc.

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

As the business landscape and market conditions for behavioral health providers continues to settle, how is your business responding, adapting, or struggling to survive? With consumer needs evolving, regulatory and payor requirement rising, and business development trends shifting, what key performance measurements and lead indicators are you utilizing? Through an exploration of financial, leadership, business development, and treatment service segments of an organization, this presentation will open a dialogue to answering the critical question of how to practically integrate these fundamental operations to produce sustainable and long-term success. Participants will discuss balancing act of delivering integrated business-operational-clinical services and explore the hazards of misbalancing mission versus margin. Through an examination of industry trends, practice-based evidence, and evidence-based experience in developing the strategic and tactical plans for attainment, growth, and sustainability, participants will learn pragmatic tools for understanding their organizations current needs and develop actionable plans for enhancing their organizations continued growth.

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

Saturday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

 

375. Managed Care 101 (No CE/CME)
David Nefussy
Supported by: Spectrum Health Systems

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This presentation will provide an introduction and review on working with managed care, providing tools and concepts from how to become empaneled to how to negotiate rates, as well as avoid an audit. Other key concepts to be discussed are: medical behavioral integration; appropriate billing; coding, and the differences between contracting individually, group or an agency.

 

376. Lion Kings & Little Mermaids: Use of Modern Myth as Gestalt Experiential Hero Journey Group Work for Trauma (1.5 CE/CME)
Brian Dunphey, MS JF LMFT CSAT-C
Supported by: Blue Tiger Recovery, CSU Long Beach

Level of Instruction: All

This workshop will cover best practices for trauma-informed, group interventions for addiction. Participants will strengthen their use of Gestalt-Experiential Theory and Intervention as an effective means of assessment, psycho-education and coping skill practice for addiction and trauma responses. Attendees will participate in a Gestalt-Experiential intervention drawn from popular myth.

 

377. Single-Gender Groups for Women Suffering from Opioid Use Disorder: Theory and Treatment (1.5 CE/CME)
Efrat Fridman, DSW, LCSW

Level of Instruction: All

Gilligan (1982) stated that authenticity and self-esteem of women are linked to relationships, and that maintaining relationships is necessary and healthy for women. Where women’s relationships fail, or are dysfunctional, there is a decrease in self-esteem, an increase in depression, and an increase use of drugs or alcohol.
A single-gender group context has been proposed to be most effective for women who suffer from substance use disorders. In some of the most recent studies on single-gender groups, it was found that over a one-year follow-up time-period, women who participated in single gender groups reported significantly less substance use and criminal activity than women who participated in mixed-group treatment. By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to identify the unique barriers women who use drugs face when they attend treatment. In addition, the participants will be walked through the process of developing a single gender day center, which was developed to address women’s unique needs and overcome barriers women face when they enter treatment.

 

378. Opioid Use Disorder: The Brain’s Neurobiological Choice in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (1.5 CE/CME)
James Lewis Fenley, MD
Supported by: SMA Health Care
Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

PTSD is marked by emotional dysregulation. Opioids are potent modulators of emotional and physiological processes. With significant symptom overlap, research has found particularly high co-morbidity between opioid use disorder and PTSD. The brain initially seems to choose opioids to improve function of damaged structures in PTSD, such as the hippocampus and the inferior portion of the frontal lobe. However, as negative reinforcement begins to drive addictive behaviors and opioid use disorder becomes a stress mediated illness as is PTSD, all positive effect is lost. This presentation will review the research, the intimate relationship of endogenous and exogenous opioids to trauma and its implications in terms of assessments and clinical treatment of opioid use disorder and PTSD.

 

379. Supporting Grief Work in Recovery (1.5 CE/CME)
Don Scherling, PsyD, LADC, AADC, ICCDP-D
Supported by: Berkshire Medical Center

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Loss, mourning, and grief are an integral and unavoidable experience in human life. Substance use, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and physical and mental illness greatly increase the risk of unexpected, tragic, and traumatic losses, motivate behaviors to numb pain and distress, and multiply challenges to engaging in the important “work” of grieving. Stigma of substance use and guilt and shame, associated with accidental deaths from overdose and suicide, further complicate bereavement and loss in both active addiction and recovery. This workshop will review theories of bereavement and grief and explore practices for supporting recovery in bereaved people, whose grieving and recovery is complicated and compromised by addiction and depression.

 

380. Integrating Harm Reduction into Traditional SUD Treatment (1.5 CE/CME)
Ross Fishman, PhD, CGP, MAC
Supported by: Innovative Health Systems

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Harm Reduction is a universal truth that all cultures live by. It is a popular meme in every walk of life but not tolerated well in the field of SUDs. This presentation makes the case for incorporating HR principles and strategies into SUD treatment as both a process and a goal toward improvement of the human condition. Benefits to clinicians include a more amicable relationship, less resistance to suggestions of change and a reduction of denial. The partnering approach paradoxically gives the patient a greater sense of autonomy regarding behavior change and, therefore, a greater willingness to try new behaviors. Too often, the tendency to focus on the progress or lack thereof of the substance use distracts from the progress made toward other goals regarding relationships, work, health etc. Harm reduction incorporates progress in all of these areas as a measure of effectiveness.

Saturday Evening Lobster Bake

7:00 PM – 8:30 PM

 

 

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7:00 AM – 8:00 AM NA Just For Today – Morning Meditation Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
7:30 AM – 10:30 AM Exhibit Hall Hours
8:00 AM – 1:15 PM Onsite Registration Hours in Barnstable II
1:00 PM – 5:00 PM Intensive Learning Sessions

New England Chapters of ASAM Business Meeting

8:00 AM – 8:45 AM

Join the New England Chapters of ASAM Annual Regional Business Meeting: Come meet other physicians working in the field of addiction medicine/psychiatry and share regional issues and triumphs. All physicians are encouraged to join us for a delicious complimentary breakfast and discussion—(ASAM members/ other physicians only)

Sunday Morning Workshops

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

400. Prodependence: The End of Codependency (1.5 CE/CME)
Robert Weiss, PhD, MSW
Supported by: Seeking Integrity LLC

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Over the past near 3-decades, Codpendency has been the go-to model for loved ones and spouses of addicts and alcoholics, yet it has never become a formal diagnosis, today serving more as a pop-psychology concept, than a functional treatment modality. Prodependence is an attachment-focused, entirely new invitational paradigm designed encourage the participation of spouses and family members in addiction treatment and recovery. This talk will introduce the topic and the treatment methodology of Prodependence.

NE ASAM Sunday Morning Workshop

9:00 AM – 9:45 AM

 

401. Managing Opioid Dependency- Rational Strategies (0.75 CE/CME)
Alan Wartenberg, MD, FACP, DFASAM
Supported by: New England Chapters of ASAM

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

This workshop will present the best practices in treatment of opioid dependency, including short, intermediate and long-term detoxification, antagonist therapies, and agonist maintenance. It will also discuss the patient and treatment characteristics (patient/treatment matching) strategies that have the strongest evidence base. There will be a discussion of the need for patient-centered rather than ideological considerations in the shared decision making of the best possible treatment for each patient, based on the best current evidence.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Sunday Closing Plenary

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

 

450. Improving Care with the ASAM Criteria Toolkit: Lessons from 50,000 Cases (1.5 CE/CME)
David Gastfriend, MD, DFASAM
Sara Cleveland, MSW, MLADC
Supported by: CONTINUUM & Southeastern NH Alcohol and Drug Abuse Services

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

The ASAM Criteria’s 6 dimensions of assessment are validated by research. Increasingly, U.S. providers are now using ASAM’s CONTINUUM software to conduct biopsychosocial assessments, diagnose DSM-5 substance use disorders, measure withdrawal, track improvement, and speed managed care authorizations. New Hampshire and Massachusetts programs are using these tools routinely. Remarkably, thousands of U.S. clinicians have now assessed over 50,000 cases. Large-scale analysis reveals important lessons for practice. Empirical findings are driving revisions for the next edition of the ASAM Criteria, yielding strategies for the opioid epidemic – and ways individual clinicians can improve the care of each patient. Theoretical/clinical approaches include Motivational Interviewing, service unbundling, open- to close-ended questioning, and cross-dimensional integrated care planning. These approaches will enhance participants’ skills by helping to further individualize evaluation and enhance patient-centric treatment planning skills for:

  • Both novice & experienced providers
  • MAT selection
  • Medical/nursing assessments, even by non-medical/non-nursing staff
  • Achieving effective Mental Health assessments by Substance Use Disorder providers
  • Assessing justice system-referred patients

Afternoon Break for Intensive Learning Attendees

3:00 PM – 3:30 PM

Sunday Intensive Learning Workshops

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

 

500. The Power of Groups Using Motivational Interviewing (3.5 CE/CME)
Stephen Andrew, LCSW, LADC, CCS, CGP
Supported by: Health Education and Training Institute

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Group work provides several important steps that help break isolation often experienced by a consumer. This training will provide a brief review and practice of Motivational Interviewing spirit and some basic skills and information on the issues and treatment of special populations (adolescents, dual diagnosis, addiction, intimacy, low-income families, parents, etc.) through the use of support groups in treatment. This presentation will explore the issues of assessment, interaction, group norms, and various forms of support for the consumer. We will also address why the therapeutic support group format is extremely effective. In addition to the role of group leader, the roles of the participants will be discussed and compared in various types of group settings, as well as the importance of therapeutic contracts, goal setting, and group frequency duration, course, and process. This session will utilize both useful theoretical models and hands-on opportunities to improve skills.

 

501. Healing Addiction and Shame Through Self-Compassion (3.5 CE/CME)
Sarah Buino, LCSW, CADC, CDWF
Supported by: Head/Heart Therapy, Inc

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Shame is a common denominator that runs deep through people struggling with substance use disorders. Only when shame is brought to light can it be healed through empathy and self-compassion, providing clients with a more wholehearted sense of self.

In this workshop, a shame-resilience lens cultivated by Brené Brown’s work is combined with the self-compassion literature of Kristin Neff and Tim Desmond. The presenter will discuss components and functions of shame and self-compassion from a scientific and philosophical framework to combine the art and science of these concepts. Approaches include affective neuroscience and the endocrinological consequences of living in shame versus utilizing the practices of self-compassion. Participants will be given specific clinical tools: a diagnostic instrument to determine a client’s level of self-compassion, memory reconsolidation techniques to transform clients’ difficult experiences, and ways to execute the components of shame-resilience in a variety of clinical settings.

 

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  • CCSAD is a wonderful conference bringing together addiction professionals of all types in one large collaborative setting. It has become an absolute must for me each year and provides excellent quality and value for continuing medical education.


  • This event was one of the most informative learning experiences I've ever had in my 28 years of work!


  • The Cape Cod Symposium is a primary source of new information and new developments in the field of addiction. It is my most important professional development activity every year. The reputation of the conference seems to just keep getting better and better. See you in September.


  • I have gone to many conferences in my over 30 years in the addiction field and I can say I like this one the best. It was professional people with great, knowledge, insights, and experiences getting together and sharing and supporting each other. That to me is what it is all about.


  • I look forward to this conference every year. I always leave with a full tool bag and a renewed confidence in new and exciting ways to take care of those suffering from addictions!


  • CCSAD continues to be the premier training and education event for the addiction field because it does so well what others try to do, but fall short. It provides the opportunity for the frontline practitioner and administrator to experience gold standard, relevant, challenging, thought-provoking, and meaningful content, while also offering unique networking opportunities that are both fun and renewing for the spirit. One simply can't do better!


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